Association of Proteobacteria and Bacteriodetes with Obese Related Type-2 Diabetes Mellitus

Ifeanyi Onyema Oshim *

Department of Medical Laboratory Science, Faculty of Basic Medicine and Health Sciences, Benson Idahosa University, Benin City, Nigeria.

Nneka Regina Agbakoba

Department of Medical Laboratory Science, Faculty of Health Sciences and Technology, Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Nnewi Campus, Nnewi, Anambra State, Nigeria.

Kingsley C. Anukam

Department of Medical Laboratory Science, Faculty of Health Sciences and Technology, Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Nnewi Campus, Nnewi, Anambra State, Nigeria and Uzobiogene Genomics, London, Ontario, Canada.

Ajirioghene Anthonia Obroh

Department of Medical Laboratory Science, Faculty of Health Sciences and Technology, Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Nnewi Campus, Nnewi, Anambra State, Nigeria.

Chioma Maureen Obi

Department of Medical Laboratory Science, Faculty of Health Sciences and Technology, Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Nnewi Campus, Nnewi, Anambra State, Nigeria.

Amaechi Chukwudi Ofodile

Department of Medical Laboratory Science, Faculty of Health Sciences and Technology, Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Nnewi Campus, Nnewi, Anambra State, Nigeria.

*Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.


Abstract

Background: Metabolic conditions such as Type2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and obesity have become worldwide public health important. Numerous evidences indicate that gut Proteobacteria and Bacteriodetes are associated with these co-morbidities. Thus, the gut microbiota serves as a promising target for prognosis of metabolic disorders. The aim of this study is to evaluate the role of gut Proteobacteria and Bacteriodetes on obese related Type 2 diabetes mellitus. The gut microbiota signature of 10 adults was studied using 16S rRNA sequencing targeting V3–V4 hypervariable regions and obtained data was analyzed using Statistical Package for the Social Science (SPSS version 26). Result: The Pearson correlation analysis showed that phyla Bacteriodetes was significant positive when correlated with Body mass index (BMI) (r = 0.666, p = 0.002*), followed by phyla proteobacteria (r = 0.464, p = 0.045*), Firmicutes versus BMI (p>0.05), Actinobacteria versus BMI (p>0.05), while Firmicutes versus Glycated hemoglobin(HbA1c) (p>0.05), Bacteriodetes versus HbA1c (p>0.05), Proteobacteria versus HbA1c (p>0.05), Actinobacteria versus HbA1c (p> 0.05). Conclusion: The study revealed the abundance of phyla Proteobacteria and phyla Bacteriodetes were significantly associated with obese related type 2 diabetes mellitus. Although, these Phyla/ taxa showed no significant correlation with Hb1Ac in obese related type 2 diabetes mellitus.

Keywords: Type2 diabetes, obese, Proteobacteria, Bacteriodetes, glycated hemoglobin, body mass index


How to Cite

Oshim, I. O., Agbakoba, N. R., Anukam , K. C., Obroh , A. A., Obi , C. M., & Ofodile, A. C. (2023). Association of Proteobacteria and Bacteriodetes with Obese Related Type-2 Diabetes Mellitus. International Journal of Pathogen Research, 12(1), 38–44. https://doi.org/10.9734/ijpr/2023/v12i1219

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