Detection of Soil-transmitted Helminths and their Risk Factors in Some Local Government Primary Schools Sokoto, Nigeria

K. Mohammed *

Department of Medical Microbiology, School of Medical Laboratory Sciences, College of Health Sciences, Usmanu Danfodiyo University, Sokoto, Nigeria.

M. U. Iduh

Department of Medical Microbiology, School of Medical Laboratory Sciences, College of Health Sciences, Usmanu Danfodiyo University, Sokoto, Nigeria.

M. Sani

Department of Medical Microbiology, School of Medical Laboratory Sciences, College of Health Sciences, Usmanu Danfodiyo University, Sokoto, Nigeria.

Y. Mohammed

Department of Medical Microbiology and Parasitology, Faculty of Basic Clinical Sciences, College of Health Science, Usmanu Danfodiyo University, Sokoto, Nigeria.

*Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.


Abstract

Background: Soil-transmitted helminths are among the neglected tropical disease parasites of humans and one of the major public health burdens in developing countries, particularly Sub-Saharan Africa. It is estimated that about 1.5 billion people are affected worldwide.

Aims: The study was aimed to determine the prevalence and risk factors of Soil-transmitted helminths infection among primary school children.

Study Design: This was a cross sectional, descriptive study.

Place and Duration of Study: The study was conducted among primary school children within the age of 4-15 years old in Sokoto South, Wamakko, Yabo and Dange Shuni local government areas of Sokoto State from February 2021 to July 2021.

Methodology: Faecal samples of 252 children were collected and analyzed using formol-ether concentration technique.

Results: An overall prevalence of 6.0% was recorded. Differential prevalence of parasite species showed 6.7% Ascaris lumbricoide, and 93.3% hookworm infection. There was high prevalence among Males (7.2%) than Females (4.0%). The age group 10-12 has the high prevalence of 9.8%. The high prevalence of 9.5% was obtained in Yabo and Sokoto South respectively. Tap water and water closet users have the lowest prevalence of 5.3%. High prevalence of 33.3% was recorded among borehole users contaminated with soil.

Conclusion: The total low prevalence of soil-transmitted helminths may be as a result of improved awareness of the Soil-transmitted helminths in the study area. The government, non-government agencies should help in the provision of social amenities to ensure the total eradication of these diseases. The teaching of health education in both private and public schools should be encouraged by the government.

Keywords: Primary school children formol-ether, soil-transmitted helminthes, stool, Sokoto


How to Cite

Mohammed , K., Iduh , M. U., Sani, M., & Mohammed , Y. (2023). Detection of Soil-transmitted Helminths and their Risk Factors in Some Local Government Primary Schools Sokoto, Nigeria. International Journal of Pathogen Research, 12(2), 1–8. https://doi.org/10.9734/ijpr/2023/v12i2220

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