Epidemiology of Gastrointestinal Helminths Infection in Buffalo of New Alluvial Zone of West Bengal, India

Ruma Jas *

West Bengal University of Animal and Fishery Sciences, 37, Kshudiram Bose Sarani, Kolkata – 700 037, West Bengal, India.

Dhananjay Kumar

Krishi Vigyan Kendra, Nawada-805 106, Bihar, India.

Soumitra Pandit

West Bengal University of Animal and Fishery Sciences, 37, Kshudiram Bose Sarani, Kolkata – 700 037, West Bengal, India.

Surajit Baidya

West Bengal University of Animal and Fishery Sciences, 37, Kshudiram Bose Sarani, Kolkata – 700 037, West Bengal, India.

Abhijit Nandi

West Bengal University of Animal and Fishery Sciences, 37, Kshudiram Bose Sarani, Kolkata – 700 037, West Bengal, India.

*Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.


Abstract

Aims: Epidemiology of naturally occurring gastrointestinal (GI) helminths was studied in buffalo of New Alluvial Zone of West Bengal and the role of different factors such as season, age, sex and rearing practices on prevalence was also recorded in the present study. 

Methodology: Monthly 120 faecal samples of buffaloes of New Alluvial Zone (NAZ) were collected and examined by standard parasitological techniques from April, 2016 to March, 2017.

Results: The overall prevalence of GI helminths was recorded as 46.53% in buffalo of NAZ in West Bengal. Paramphistome (35.9%) was observed as the predominant parasite followed by Strongyle (9.93%), Fasciola (4.17%) and Toxocara (4.03%). Monsoon (54.58%) was found to be the most favourable season followed by winter (44.79%) and summer (40.21%) for GI helminths infection in buffalo. The overall prevalence (52.57%) as well as prevalence of Strongyle and Toxocara was higher in young buffaloes than the adult buffaloes (44.47%). The overall prevalence of GI helminths was higher in female buffalo (48.85%) than the male (40.74%) and the prevalence of individual parasites did not vary greatly between the two sexes of animals. Semi-intensive system (54.46%) of rearing showed higher prevalence of GI helminths than the intensive method (39.07%). Prevalence of Strongyle, Fasciola and Paramphistome was comparatively higher in animals maintaining under semi-intensive system than the intensive system of rearing.

Conclusion: The results of the present study might be utilized for planning control programme against GI helminths in buffaloes of NAZ of West Bengal.

Keywords: Buffalo, epidemiological factors, gastrointestinal helminths, new alluvial zone, prevalence


How to Cite

Jas, Ruma, Dhananjay Kumar, Soumitra Pandit, Surajit Baidya, and Abhijit Nandi. 2024. “Epidemiology of Gastrointestinal Helminths Infection in Buffalo of New Alluvial Zone of West Bengal, India”. International Journal of Pathogen Research 13 (3):111-18. https://doi.org/10.9734/ijpr/2024/v13i3291.

Downloads

Download data is not yet available.

References

Jas R, Ghosh JD, Pandit S, Kumar D, Brahma A, Das S, et al. Economic impact of gastrointestinal nematodosis in terms of meat production in small ruminants of West Bengal. Int J Microbiol Res. 2017a;9(1):834 – 836.

Wadhwa A, Tanwar RK, Singla LD, Eda S, Kumar N, Kumar Y. Prevalence of gastrointestinal helminths in cattle and buffaloes in Bikaner, Rajasthan, India. Vet World. 2011;4(9):417–419.

Sreedevi C, Hafeez M. Prevalence of gastrointestinal parasites in buffaloes (Bubalus Bubalis) in and around Tirupati, India. Buffalo Bulletin. 2014;33(3):251–255.

Nath S, Das G, Dixit AK, Agrawal V, Kumar S, Singh AK, et al. Epidemiological studies on gastrointestinal parasites of buffaloes in seven agroclimatic zones of Madhya Pradesh, India. Buffalo Bulletin. 2016;35(3):355 – 364.

Das G, Kumbhakar NK, Verma R, Lata K, Saiyam RA. Coprological survey of common gastrointestinal parasitic infections in buffaloes in Jabalpur district of Madhya Pradesh, India. J Entomol Zoology Studies. 2018;6(2):315–318.

Shit N, Hajra DK, Baidya S, Debbarma A. Seasonal occurrence of gastrointestinal helminth parasites in cattle and buffaloes in Bankura district, West Bengal, India. Exploratory Anim Med Res. 2017;7(1):58–63.

Jas R, Kumar D, Pandit S, Baidya S, Brahma A, Rai S. Epidemiology of naturally occurring gastrointestinal helminthoses in buffalo of Coastal zone of West Bengal, India. Journal of Entomol Zoology Studies. 2020;8(5):1512–1516.

Regassa F, Sori T, Dhuguma R, Kiros Y. Epidemiology of gastrointestinal parasites of ruminants in western Oromia, Ethiopia. Int J Applied Res Vet Med. 2006;4(1):51–57.

Jas R, Ghosh JD. Economic impact of gastrointestinal nematodosis in sheep: Enhanced meat production by anthelmintic treatment. Indian J Anim Sci. 2009;79(8):3–5.

Raza MA, Murtaza S, Bachaya HA, Arshad HM, Naeem M, Kazmi HF. Predominance of gastrointestinal helminthiasis in Ovis aries (sheep) at the vicinity of Jatoi Pakistan Science. Int J Scientific Res Pub. 2016;24:289–292.

Jas R, Kumar D, Bhandari A, Pandit S. Seasonal alteration in prevalence and intensity of naturally occurring gastrointestinal helminths infection in goats of New Alluvial zone of West Bengal, India. Biol Rhythm Res. 2017b;48(6):867–876.

Jas R, Pandit S. Seasonal variation in prevalence of gastrointestinal helminthoses in cattle of New Alluvial zone of West Bengal, India. Biol Rhythm Res. 2017;48(4):631–637.

Soulsby EJL. A text book of helminths, arthropods and protozoa in domesticated animals. 7th edn. ELBS and Bailliere Tindall, London; 1982.

Patel HC, Hasnani JJ, Patel PV, Pandya SS, Solanki JB, Jadav SJ. A study on helminth parasites of buffaloes brought to Ahmedabad slaughter house, Gujarat, India. Int J Life Sci Pharma Res. 2015;5(1):20-27.

Singh NK, Singh H, Haque M, Rath SS. Prevalence of parasitic infections in buffaloes in and around district Ludhiana (Punjab, India). J Buffalo Sci. 2012;1(1):113–117.

Biswas H, Dey AR, Begum N, Das PM. Epidemiological aspects of gastro-intestinal parasites in buffalo in Bhola, Bangladesh. Ind J Anim Sci. 2014;84(3):245–250.

Thakre BK, Kumar B, Brahmbhatt N, Parmar VL, Patel J, Damor J et al. Gastrointestinal parasitic infections in cattle and buffaloes in southwestern region of Gujarat, India. Ind J Anim Sci. 2019;89(7):735–737.

Zaman MA, Sajid M, Sikandar A, Tauseef-ur-Rehman, Awais MM. Point prevalence of gastrointestinal helminths and their association with sex and age of the buffaloes in lower Punjab, Pakistan. Int J Agri Biol. 2014;16:1229–1231.

Deeba F, Qureshi AS, Kashif AR, Saleem I. Epidemiology of different gastrointestinal helminths in buffaloes in relation to age, sex and body condition of the host. J. Entomol Zoology Studies. 2019;7(1):1533–1540.

Sylvia OU, Stephen OA, Oladeji MH, Abdulhakeem AA, Micheal AO, Friday EU. Gastrointestinal helminth Infections in a ruminant livestock farm in abeokuta, south western nigeria. Annual Research & Review in Biology, 2015;8(4):1–8. https://doi.org/10.9734/ARRB/2015/18812

Ugbomeh AP, Okere S, Sokari GM, Aisien MSO, Chimela W. Helminth parasites of gobies from two creeklets of the new Calabar River, Rivers State, Nigeria. Asian Journal of Biology. 2018;6(4):1–10.

https://doi.org/10.9734/AJOB/2018/45024

Mishra PK, Palma M, Bleich D, Loke P, Gause WC. Systemic impact of intestinal helminth infections. Mucosal immunology. 2014 Jul 1;7(4):753-62.